Wolverine

Wolverine Description & Facts

Wolverines (Gulo gulo) are carnivorous mammals native to the northern hemisphere, found in Alaska, Canada, Siberia, and northern Europe. Due to habitat loss and over-trapping, wolverines are now extremely rare in the lower 48 states and are currently only confirmed to exist in Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. They are known for their strength, ferocity, and ability to survive in harsh and remote environments.

Here are some facts about Wolverines

Physical Characteristics

Wolverines are the largest land-dwelling species of the weasel family, with males weighing up to 40 pounds and females up to 30 pounds. They have a stocky build, short legs, and a bushy tail. Their fur is thick and dark brown, with lighter markings on their neck and face.

Diet

Wolverines are opportunistic hunters and scavengers, and their diet consists of a variety of prey, including small mammals, birds, fish, and carrion. They are also known to cache food for later use, burying it in the snow and returning to it as needed.

Habitat

Wolverines are adapted to survive in harsh and remote environments, including the Arctic tundra, boreal forests, and high-elevation mountain ranges. They are solitary animals and have an extensive home range, typically covering hundreds of square miles.

Reproduction

Female wolverines give birth to litters of 1 to 6 kits in late winter or early spring. The kits stay with their mother for up to two years, learning to hunt and survive in their environment.

Conservation

Due to habitat loss, trapping, and climate change, Wolverine populations have declined in some areas. Conservation efforts are underway to protect and manage wolverine populations, including habitat protection and regulation of trapping practices.

Unique Adaptations

Wolverines have several adaptations that allow them to survive in harsh environments. For example, their dense fur provides insulation against the cold, and their sharp claws and powerful jaws enable them to dig through the snow to access food. They can also tolerate low levels of food availability and can go without eating for several days.

There are many misconceptions about wolverines; here are a few:

  1. Size: Wolverines are often portrayed as much larger than they actually are. In reality, they are around the size of a large domestic cat, weighing 30-60 pounds.
  2. Aggressiveness: Wolverines are often characterized as aggressive and fierce animals that attack humans. In reality, wolverines are shy and elusive, and there have been very few recorded instances of wolverines attacking humans.
  3. Diet: Wolverines are often characterized as pure carnivores; however, their diet is actually omnivorous and includes both plant and animal matter.
  4. Distribution: Wolverines are often believed to be restricted to the Arctic tundra, but in reality, they have a wider distribution and can be found in the northern forests of North America and Eurasia.
  5. Solitude: Wolverines are often believed to be solitary animals, but they are very social and form bonds with other wolverines, especially during the breeding season.

These misconceptions can lead to misunderstandings about wolverines and their behavior and can impact conservation efforts for this species.

Here are some less known facts about wolverines

Wolverines are fascinating and unique creatures that are often shrouded in mystery. Despite their reputation as tough and fierce predators, many aspects of wolverine biology and behavior have yet to be well-known to the public. Here are some lesser-known facts about wolverines:

  • Wolverines have a large range: Wolverines have a vast historical range, which spans across the Arctic and into the boreal forests of North America and Eurasia. They are found in Alaska, Canada, and some northern U.S. states such as Montana, Idaho, and Washington.
  • Wolverines are scavengers: While wolverines are often depicted as fearsome hunters, they are opportunistic scavengers that feed on a wide variety of food sources, including carrion, small mammals, birds, and fish. Wolverines are also known to cache food and return to it later, a unique behavior among North American carnivores.
  • Wolverines have a low reproductive rate: Wolverines have a slow reproductive rate, and females only breed every two to three years. Litters typically consist of one to three kits, which are born in dens and stay with their mother for up to two years.
  • Wolverines have a high metabolism: Wolverines have an extremely high metabolism and need to consume large amounts of food to maintain their body weight. In some areas, they may travel over 60 miles in a single day in search of food.
  • Wolverines are threatened by human activity: Wolverines are considered a species of conservation concern due to the impact of human activities, such as climate change, habitat destruction, and trapping. Conservation efforts are underway to protect wolverine populations and their habitats.

These are just a few of the many fascinating facts about wolverines. Despite their tough reputation, these animals are in need of protection, and understanding their biology and behavior is an important step in ensuring their survival.


In conclusion, Wolverines are remarkable animals well-adapted to survive in challenging environments. Despite facing various threats, they continue to thrive in many parts of their range. Therefore, understanding their biology and conservation needs is important for ensuring the long-term survival of this unique species.

Wolverine Trail Camera Photos & Videos

Day picture: Wolverine - Lower 48 USA - Akaso TC04
110 0 Captured: Nov. 16, 2021

Wolverine - Lower 48 USA

Wolverines are very rare in the lower 48!

Manufacturer: Akaso Model: Akaso TC04
Animal: Wolverine Family: Weasels (Mustelidae)


Day picture: Wolverine - Day picture - GardePro A3
91 0 Captured: Feb. 27, 2021

Wolverine - Day picture

Wolverine night picture from GardePro A3

Manufacturer: GardePro Model: GardePro A3
Animal: Wolverine Family: Weasels (Mustelidae)


To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video

85 0 Captured: March 17, 2022

Early Spring Wolverine

Early Spring Wolverine - Lower 48 USA

Manufacturer: Browning Trail Cameras Model: Browning Patriot
Animal: Wolverine Family: Weasels (Mustelidae)


Day picture: Wolverine - Night picture - GardePro A3
86 0 Captured: Feb. 27, 2021

Wolverine - Night picture

Wolverine night picture from GardePro A3

Manufacturer: GardePro Model: GardePro A3
Animal: Wolverine Family: Weasels (Mustelidae)


Day picture: Daylight Wolverine by GardePro - GardePro A3
85 0 Captured: April 21, 2021

Daylight Wolverine by GardePro

Wolverine picture from GardePro A3

Manufacturer: GardePro Model: GardePro A3
Animal: Wolverine Family: Weasels (Mustelidae)


Day picture: Running Wolverine - Akaso TC04
109 0 Captured: Jan. 29, 2018

Running Wolverine

Wolverines are very in the lower 48!

Manufacturer: Akaso Model: Akaso TC04
Animal: Wolverine Family: Weasels (Mustelidae)


To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video

70 0 Captured: Jan. 27, 2022

Wolverine sniffing in snow

Wolverine sniffing in snow - Lower 48 USA

Manufacturer: Browning Trail Cameras Model: Browning Patriot
Animal: Wolverine Family: Weasels (Mustelidae)


To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video

60 0 Captured: March 14, 2022

Wolverine in deep snow

Wolverine in deep snow - Lower 48 USA

Manufacturer: Browning Trail Cameras Model: Browning Patriot
Animal: Wolverine Family: Weasels (Mustelidae)


To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video

60 0 Captured: Nov. 17, 2021

Wolverine in snow

Wolverine - Lower 48 USA

Manufacturer: Browning Trail Cameras Model: Browning Patriot
Animal: Wolverine Family: Weasels (Mustelidae)


To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video

65 0 Captured: Feb. 26, 2022

Wolverine on a move

Wolverine on a move - Lower 48 USA

Manufacturer: Browning Trail Cameras Model: Browning Patriot
Animal: Wolverine Family: Weasels (Mustelidae)


1